Using a Systematic Conceptual Model for a Process Evaluation of a Middle School Obesity Risk-Reduction Nutrition Curriculum Intervention: Choice, Control & Change

Using a Systematic Conceptual Model for a Process Evaluation of a Middle School Obesity Risk-Reduction Nutrition Curriculum Intervention: Choice, Control & Change

Category: Adolescents
Using a Systematic Conceptual Model for a Process Evaluation of a Middle School Obesity Risk-Reduction Nutrition Curriculum Intervention: Choice, Control & Change

Speaker: Heewon Lee, PhD, RD, Teachers College Columbia University

Learning Objectives:

1. Gain an overall understanding of process evaluation in school-based nutrition intervention studies. recognize advantages of using a systematic conceptual model for process evaluation

2. Identify components and measures of process evaluation used in the Choice, Control & Change curriculum intervention

3. Understand the findings of process evaluation in the Choice, Control & Change curriculum intervention.

Objective: To use and review a conceptual model of process evaluation and to examine the implementation of a nutrition education curriculum, Choice, Control & Change, designed to promote dietary and physical activity behaviors that reduce obesity risk.

Design: A process evaluation study based on a systematic conceptual model. Setting: Five middle schools in New York City. Participants: Five hundred sixty-two students in 20 classes and their science teachers (n = 8). Main Outcome Measures: Based on the model, teacher professional development, teacher implementation, and student reception were evaluated. Also measured were teacher characteristics, teachers’ curriculum evaluation, and satisfaction with teaching the curriculum.

Analysis: Descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation for quantitative analysis and content analysis for qualitative data were used.

Results: Mean score of the teacher professional development evaluation was 4.75 on a 5-point scale. Average teacher implementation rate was 73%, and the student reception rate was 69%. Ongoing teacher support was highly valued by teachers. Teacher satisfaction with teaching the curriculum was highly correlated with student satisfaction (P less than .05). Teacher perception of amount of student work was negatively correlated with implementation and with student satisfaction (P less than .05).

Conclusions and Implications: Use of a systematic conceptual model and comprehensive process measures improves understanding of the implementation process and helps educators to better implement interventions as designed.

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