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Getting Prepped to Visit Lawmakers: Tips and Guidance on Meeting with Policy Makers on the Importance of Nutrition Education

Category: Advocacy and Public Policy
 Getting Prepped to Visit Lawmakers: Tips and Guidance on Meeting with Policy Makers on the Importance of Nutrition Education

(Recorded 6/13/17)

Speakers: Alison Hard, MS, Columbia University Teachers College; Jennifer Noll Folliard, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; Tracy Fox MS, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC.; Melissa K. Maulding, MS, RD, Purdue University; Claire Uno, MLIS, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy; and Margo Wootan, Center for Science in the Public Interest

This year, the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior's (SNEB) annual conference is located in our nation’s Capital. With looming cuts to important social programs, what better opportunity could there be to gather the troops and educate our elected officials on the importance of nutrition education in our country?

While we will be highlighting lawmakers in DC, the tips covered can be applied to any visits and connections with policy makers at all levels.  Don’t miss out on the important information! 

This is great for anyone who wants to share the importance of nutrition education with their elected officials. It will also help people attending the "Nutrition Educators As Advocates" pre-conference session get ready to visit their Members of Congress. 

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Journal Club 10: Influence of Teachers? Health Behaviors on Operationalizing Obesity Prevention Policy in Head Start

Category: Journal Club: Policies, Systems, and Environmental Change Initiatives and Programs to Improve Health
 Journal Club 10: Influence of Teachers? Health Behaviors on Operationalizing Obesity Prevention Policy in Head Start

(Recorded 5/2/17)

Speaker: Monica Kazlausky Esquivel, PhD, RDN, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa

http://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(16)00071-3/fulltext

Strategies to improve teacher health status and behaviors included in a multi-component policy intervention aimed at child obesity prevention may produce a greater effect on classroom environments.

Learning objectives:
1. To review the literature on factors that affect the efficacy of child care center wellness policy implementation on the obesogenic environment within preschool settings.
2. To discuss how the Children's Healthy Living Program child care wellness policy intervention was designed to address multiple levels of the socioecological model to positively influence the nutrition and physical activity environments in Head Start classrooms.
3. To identify key strategies and lessons learned from this program that could support effective wellness policy implementation in child care centers to address childhood obesity.

Monica Kazlausky Esquivel RD, PhD is a nutrition lecturer in the Department of Human Nutrition Food and Animal Sciences at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Director of the Health Promotion and Disease Prevention at Wai‘anae Coast Comprehensive Health Center. Her work focuses on health promotion and disease prevention efforts that are multi-level in nature and community based. Monica completed her doctoral graduate studies in nutrition at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and was a recipient of a Children's Healthy Living Program for Remote Underserved Minority Populations in the Pacific Region training scholarship.

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8 Steps to Becoming a Reporting Rockstar

Category: Communication
8 Steps to Becoming a Reporting Rockstar

Speakers: Stephanie Evergreen PhD, Evergreen Evaluation and Data Sponsored by the SNEB Communications Division

Learning Objectives:

1. Articulate reasons we should care about communication

2. Identify how color and font help a viewer make sense of a presentation

3. Describe methods for presenting information so audiences aren't overwhelmed

4. State adjustments to graphics for a more powerful presentation

Handout

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A Closer Look at Dairy Alternative Beverages Antibiotics and GMOs

Category: Nutritional Science
A Closer Look at Dairy  Alternative Beverages Antibiotics and GMOs

Speaker: Melissa Joy Dobbins, MS, RDN, CDE Objectives 1.Understand the facts behind dairy nutrition and the science supporting dietary recommendations for 3 daily servings of dairy 2.Discuss the benefits and risks of choosing milk alternatives including which patients may benefit as well as the unintended consequences of avoiding milk 3.Increase knowledge of on-farm practices and their implications on the safety of dairy foods 4.Discuss dairy production concepts of sustainability, stewardship and local family farms

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A Content Analysis of Food References in Television Programming Specifically Targeting Tween Viewing Audiences

Category: Communication
A Content Analysis of Food References in Television Programming Specifically Targeting Tween Viewing Audiences

Speaker: Mary Roseman, PhD, RD, LD - Associate Professor and Hospitality Management Program Director | School of Applied Sciences | Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management

Learning Objectives:

1. Explain literature on food references in TV advertisements and programs

2. Explain methods for and findings from content analysis of food references in tweens' TV programming

3. Discuss implication of findings and opportunities to future TV programming

Slides

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A cross-cultural comparison of eating behaviors home food environmental factors in adolescents from São Paul

Category: Cultural
A cross-cultural comparison of eating behaviors   home food environmental factors in adolescents from São Paul

Speaker: Dr. Camilla de Chermont Prochnik Estima This webinar is a presentation about research conducted on eating behaviors and environmental factors.

Slides

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A Healthy Perspective: 2017 Food and Consumer Buying Habits, Consumer Confusion and Trends

Category: Nutrition Education for Consumers

(Recorded 5/18/17)

Speakers: Liz Sanders, RD, MPH and Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, IFIC

Although there is no shortage of research examining American’s perceptions around food, there is remains little consumer research helping unpack factors that drive food purchasing decisions. This session will highlight new research illustrating purchasing trends as well as specific factors contributing to food busy habits across the lifespan. This session will showcase the latest IFIC Food & Health Report findings, now in its 12th year.

Learning objectives:
1. Understand current food purchasing habits and how they have changed over time.
2. Understand how factors like income, gender, chronic disease, and education affect food purchasing and eating behaviors
3. Recognize differences in food purchasing and eating behaviors between baby boomers, older adults and the general population
4. Learn who consumers are turning to for nutrition information, and confusion in the food information landscape

Liz Sanders, MPH, RDN is Associate Director of Nutrition and Food Safety at the International Food Information Council Foundation. In addition to writing educational materials on various food and nutrition topics, Liz manages the planning and implementation of the yearly IFIC Foundation Food and Health Survey. Liz is a fervent science advocate, dedicated to delivering sound nutrition information with relatability and wit.

Before joining IFIC, Liz served as a nutrition educator in a variety of settings including diabetes self-management and community health centers. Liz received her undergraduate degree in Biology from Oberlin College, and is a graduate of the MPH/RD combined program in Nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

When she’s not writing for Food Insight, you can find her on the stage performing improvisational comedy with Washington Improv Theater.

Alex Lewin-Zwerdling is Vice President, Research and Partnerships. In that role she oversees IFIC’s consumer research, tracking the latest in food and nutrition trends, habits, perceptions and other factors that affect what drives America’s eating habits. Alex also develops IFIC’s partnerships across sectors, from food and agriculture companies and nutrition leaders, to public health experts, government agencies and others.

Alex joined IFIC from AARP Foundation, where she oversaw the organization’s hunger and nutrition research and strategy.  In addition, Alex was a Vice President at Weber Shandwick where she served as a communications and nutrition expert for many food, agriculture and health care clients.  Alex has also spent time at the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Services and the Pew Charitable Trusts.  She is the 2016-2017 Chair of the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior’s Advisory Committee on Public Policy.

Alex holds a PhD in Nutrition, as well as a Master’s in Public Administration and Bachelor of Science, all from Cornell University.

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A Healthy Perspective: 2017 Food and Consumer Buying Habits, Consumer Confusion and Trends

Category: Communication
A Healthy Perspective: 2017 Food and Consumer Buying Habits, Consumer Confusion and Trends

(Recorded 5/18/17)

Speakers: Liz Sanders, RD, MPH and Alexandra Lewin-Zwerdling, PhD, MPA, IFIC

Although there is no shortage of research examining American’s perceptions around food, there is remains little consumer research helping unpack factors that drive food purchasing decisions. This session will highlight new research illustrating purchasing trends as well as specific factors contributing to food busy habits across the lifespan. This session will showcase the latest IFIC Food & Health Report findings, now in its 12th year.

Learning objectives:
1. Understand current food purchasing habits and how they have changed over time.
2. Understand how factors like income, gender, chronic disease, and education affect food purchasing and eating behaviors
3. Recognize differences in food purchasing and eating behaviors between baby boomers, older adults and the general population
4. Learn who consumers are turning to for nutrition information, and confusion in the food information landscape

Liz Sanders, MPH, RDN is Associate Director of Nutrition and Food Safety at the International Food Information Council Foundation. In addition to writing educational materials on various food and nutrition topics, Liz manages the planning and implementation of the yearly IFIC Foundation Food and Health Survey. Liz is a fervent science advocate, dedicated to delivering sound nutrition information with relatability and wit.

Before joining IFIC, Liz served as a nutrition educator in a variety of settings including diabetes self-management and community health centers. Liz received her undergraduate degree in Biology from Oberlin College, and is a graduate of the MPH/RD combined program in Nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

When she’s not writing for Food Insight, you can find her on the stage performing improvisational comedy with Washington Improv Theater.

Alex Lewin-Zwerdling is Vice President, Research and Partnerships. In that role she oversees IFIC’s consumer research, tracking the latest in food and nutrition trends, habits, perceptions and other factors that affect what drives America’s eating habits. Alex also develops IFIC’s partnerships across sectors, from food and agriculture companies and nutrition leaders, to public health experts, government agencies and others.

Alex joined IFIC from AARP Foundation, where she oversaw the organization’s hunger and nutrition research and strategy.  In addition, Alex was a Vice President at Weber Shandwick where she served as a communications and nutrition expert for many food, agriculture and health care clients.  Alex has also spent time at the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Services and the Pew Charitable Trusts.  She is the 2016-2017 Chair of the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior’s Advisory Committee on Public Policy.

Alex holds a PhD in Nutrition, as well as a Master’s in Public Administration and Bachelor of Science, all from Cornell University.

Slides 
Download the complete 2017 Food and Health Survey
Download the 2017 Food and Health Survey Summaries 

$10.00
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A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a SNAP-Ed Farmers' Market-Based Nutrition Education Program

Category: Interventions
A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a SNAP-Ed Farmers' Market-Based Nutrition Education Program

Presented by Rachel Dannefer, MPH, MIA and Elizabeth Solomon, MS, RD, NYC

Learning Objectives:

• List key considerations when planning farmers’ market nutrition education programming

• Understand best practices for successful implementation of farmers’ market nutrition education programming.

• Explain the methods and results of the mixed-methods evaluation of the SNAP-Ed program described during the webinar

• Identify strengths and weaknesses of various methods for evaluating farmers’ market based nutrition education programming.

Rachel Dannefer works in research and evaluation at the NYC Health Department with a focus on food and nutrition. Her work has included research on access to healthy food and evaluations of Health Department initiatives to improve the diets of New Yorkers. She holds Masters Degrees in Public Health and International Affairs.

Elizabeth Solomon MS, RD is Senior Program Manager of Nutrition Education at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. For the past eight years she has managed SNAP-Ed programming in New York City taking place in farmers’ markets and early childhood settings.

A Mixed Methods Evaluation of a SNAP-Ed Farmers’ Market-Based Nutrition Education Program

http://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(15)00278-X/abstract 

Slides

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A Pilot Comprehensive School Nutrition Program Improves Knowledge and Intentions for Milk and Alternatives Intake among Youth in a Remote First Nation

Category: Schools
A Pilot Comprehensive School Nutrition Program Improves Knowledge and Intentions for Milk and Alternatives Intake among Youth in a Remote First Nation

Speaker: Michelle Gates RD, MSc, PhD Candidate, School of Public Health & Health Systems University of Waterloo

Learning Objectives:

1. To develop an understanding of the nutritional issues facing on-reserve First Nations youth in northern Ontario, Canada

2. To gain knowledge of an example of how a pilot school nutrition program for First Nations youth can be modeled on social cognitive theory

3. To develop an understanding of the challenges and opportunities in working in remote areas with limited resources

4. To discuss the opportunities and limitations for school nutrition programs to improve nutrition in First Nations youth, considering contextual factors (e.g., remoteness, access to and cost of healthy food, community environment)

5. To gain insight about the importance of a participatory approach and cultural appropriateness in the University-community research relationship

Slides

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