Journal Club 1: Stretching Food and Being Creative: Caregiver Response to Child Food Insecurity

Due to technical issues, we do not have a recording at this time. However, we are working with the presenters to re-record and will share with you when we have one.

Speakers: Christine E. Blake, PhD, RD, University of South Carolina & Sonya Jones, PhD, University of South Carolina

The objective of this study was to examine the strategies and behaviors caregivers use to manage the household food supply when their children experience food insecurity as measured by the US Department of Agriculture’s Household Food Security Survey Module. A Cross-sectional survey including open-ended questions about strategies and behaviors used to manage the household food supply were completed with caregivers who reported food insecurity among their children (n = 746) and were analyzed using emergent and thematic qualitative coding. Caregivers use a wide variety of strategies and behaviors to manage the household food supply when their children are food insecure that are consistent with common nutrition education suggestions, including those provided through person-level SNAP-ed. Changes to dietary quality because of food insecurity may have either positive or negative effects on dietary quality but may also have psychological implications. Application of Policy, System, and Environment (PSE) strategies like those found in the SNAP-Ed toolkit could strengthen and support individual strategies and behaviors in reaction to food insecurity.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to identify the types of strategies and behaviors caregiver use to manage the household food supply when their children are food insecure.
  2. Participants will be able to describe how strategies and behaviors caregiver use to manage the household food supply when their children are food insecure relate to common nutrition education suggestions, including those provided through person-level SNAP-ed.
  3. Participants will be able to describe the psychological and dietary quality implications of strategies and behaviors caregivers use because of food insecurity.
  4. Participants will be able to describe how the Application of Policy, System, and Environment (PSE) strategies found in the SNAP-Ed toolkit could strengthen and support individual strategies and behaviors in reaction to food insecurity.

Christine E. Blake, PhD, RD, University of South Carolina
Dr. Christine E. Blake is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior in the Arnold School of Public Health. She is a public health nutrition scientist and has previously worked as a Registered Dietitian in clinical and community settings. Dr. Blake received a BS in Food and Nutrition from SUNY Plattsburg and MS and PhD degrees in Community Nutrition from Cornell University. Dr. Blake’s work, guided by a strong desire to improve family and child nutrition, has examined parent’s food choice decisions, how the integration of work and family demands impacts these decisions. Dr. Blake is PI of the Drivers of Food Choice Competitive Grants Program funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and UK DFID to facilitate research on the drivers of food choice in low and middle income countries.

Sonya Jones, PhD, University of South Carolina