SNEB Annual Conference
Programs

Download the Registration Brochure

 

 

Saturday July 30 | Sunday, July 31 | Monday, August 1 | Tuesday, August 2 | Wednesday, August 3 Post- Conference

 

Saturday, July 30 Pre Conference

Pre-conference Session sponsored by the Food and Nutrition Extension Education and
Public Health Divisions
Using Policy Systems and Environmental Change (PSE) Interventions to Build Healthy Communities

8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Saturday 7/30 | $105 SNEB Members/ $145 Non-members | Lunch included
Moderator: Karen Barale, MS, RD, CD, Washington State University Extension
Speakers: Carol Smathers, MS, MPH, Ohio State University; Jenny Lobb, MPH, RD, LD, Ohio State University; Michelle Brill, MPH, Rutgers University Cooperative Extension; Cindy DeBlauw, MS, RD, University of Missouri Extension; Gail Feenstra, PhD, University of California, Davis; Deborah John, PhD, Oregon State University; James Salis, PhD, University of California, San Diego
Nutrition educators are working in communities to positively impact the way people live, learn, work, and play by making healthy choices easy, safe, and affordable. This preconference focuses identifying evidence-based policy, systems and environmental change interventions in nutrition education. Through interactive sessions, participants will have an opportunity to connect current practices and explore interventions that create and encourage healthy behaviors in communities.
Learning Objectives:
1. Define terms and the framework for PSE work in nutrition education
2. Identify evidence based strategies for PSE in nutrition education
3. Explore and apply PSE strategies through case studies

Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

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JNEB Pre-conference Workshop: How to Conduct and Write Systematic Reviews for JNEB
8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. | Saturday 7/30 | Reservation required
$50 student/ $90 SNEB members/ $125 non-members | Breakfast and lunch included
Speakers: Julie Reeder, PhD, MPH, CHES, State of Oregon WIC Program; Marla Reicks, PhD, RD, University of Minnesota; Megan Kocher, MLIS, University of Minnesota Libraries
Participants will actively engage in the steps of a systematic review process in a group-supported setting using a pre-selected topic of their choosing. After the workshop participants will be able to:
Clearly differentiate a systematic review from other literature review approaches.
Perfect the problem statement, one of the key steps to a successful systematic review.
More effectively identify and collaborate with a research librarian/information specialist to increase the efficiency of the search process.
Critically evaluate search results.
Craft a succinct yet comprehensive report of review findings.
Market the systematic review after publication.
The presenters will go through their own systematic review process in preparation for the workshop so they can candidly share their own experiences and how they dealt with or avoided the common pitfalls that come with conducting a review. Participants will be expected to complete a brief homework assignment prior to attending to optimize learning experiences during the workshop.

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Tour to Olivewood Gardens & Learning Center: Reconnecting Students & Families with the Natural Environment
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Saturday, 7/30 - offsite | Reservation Required | Transportation Provided and Lunch Served | $75 per person
Olivewood Gardens provides standards-based nutrition education, lessons in sustainable agriculture, and environmental stewardship to students attending school in southern San Diego County, as well as to local community residents. Olivewood Gardens is one of the few school garden programs in the country that emphasizes food preparation along with garden cultivation, teaching children and adults not just to grow but how to cook – and enjoy – tasty, healthy, whole foods since February 2010.
Learning Objectives:
Realize the importance of garden-based education, which inspires children to explore connections between plants and the natural world, and the disciplines of history, science, art, literature, math, geography and nutrition.
Consider and discuss the positive impacts of a community garden in a socioeconomically disadvantaged area.
This tour will examine the impacts and outreach initiatives of a community and garden resource facility in National City, which has one of the highest childhood obesity rates in CA. Residents’ limited knowledge and access to gardening areas highlight the transformative effects of garden-based nutrition education and environmental stewardship programming.

 

Saturday, July 30

 

Opening Comments from Dr. Susan Mayne and the Food Guide Parade
Director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Parade of National Food Guides
4:45 - 5:30 p.m., Saturday 7/30, Grand Ballroom AB
Susan Mayne is the director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this position, Dr. Mayne leads the center’s development and implementation of programs and policies related to the composition, quality, safety, and labeling of foods, food and color additives, and cosmetics.
Have you ever wondered what other countries use to guide healthy food choices among its citizens? What do these guides look like? Which countries promote nutrition by the use of food guides? Come celebrate SNEB’s cultural diversity and learn something about the world Food Guides. Food Guide Parade organized by the Division of International Nutrition Education.

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Opening Reception with the Exhibitors
5:30 - 7:30 p.m., Saturday 7/30 Pavilion | Hors d’oeuvres served
Network with your nutrition educator colleagues while browsing through the exhibit hall. Be sure to stop by each Division’s display.

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Student and Young Professional Speed Networking
7:30 - 8:30 p.m., Saturday 7/30, Grand C
Join your fellow students and young professionals for a speed networking event! This fast-paced event is structured so you’ll be introducted to a dozen professionals.

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Sunday, July 31

 

Morning Yoga SNEB Member Cassidy Sloot

7:00 - 8:00 am, Sundy, 7/31 Bayview Lawn

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Coffee with the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Editor in Chief
7:00 - 8:00 a.m., Sunday, 7/31 Spinnaker
Join JNEB Editor in Chief Karen Chapman Novakofski, PhD, RD, LDN and other JNEB editorial staff members.

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Mentor/Mentee Meetup
7:00 - 8:00 a.m. Sunday 7/31

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Opening Keynote -‘Next Practices’ Requires Collaboration to Solve Complex Issues:
A Case for Childhood Obesity 180

8:30 - 10:00 a.m., Sunday 7/31, Ballroom AB
Keynote speaker Christina Economos, PhD, is an Associate Professor and the New Balance Chair in Childhood Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and Medical School at Tufts University. She is also the co-Founder and Director of ChildObesity180, a unique organization that brings together leaders from diverse disciplines to generate urgency, and find solutions to the childhood obesity epidemic.

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JNEB Best Article and Best GEM Award Presentation
10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m., Sunday, 7/31, Ballroom AB

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Poster Abstracts & Exhibits Open
10:15 - 11:45 a.m., Sunday, 7/31, Pavilion

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Student Mixer - Networking over Lunch

11:45 am - 12:45 p.m., Sunday 7/31, The Student Committee is making plans to meet in a nearby park over lunch. It will be Bring Your Own Lunch with a list of quick local options provided. Watch for details.

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Successes and Challenges in Child Nutrition and Opportunities for Nutrition Educators
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday 7/31, Grand Ballroom C
Moderator: Tracy Fox, MPH, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC
Speaker: Jessica Donze Black, RD, MPH, The Pew Charitable Trusts; Stephanie Scarmo, PhD, MPH, The Pew Charitable Trusts
Much has changed in the school nutrition environment over the past five years. Research indicates that school nutrition is a substantial contributor to student health and wellness. Join leaders from the Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project (a joint initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) as they discuss the latest about what progress has been made, challenges that remain, and opportunities for nutrition educators to get involved in supporting further progress in child nutrition at the local, state, and federal level.
Learning Objectives:
Describe three significant recent achievements in child nutrition.
Discuss three research-based challenges faced by school nutrition programs and opportunities for overcoming them.
Identify three ways nutrition educators can get involved in supporting further progress in child nutrition at the local, state, or federal level.
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Public Policy

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Summer Food, Summer Moves: Helping Kids Stay Healthy When School is Out
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday 7/31, Nautilus 1-2
Moderator: Maya Maroto, EdD, MPH, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
Speaker: Alicia White, MS, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service; Brock Smith, SMS, Vista Unified School District; Maya Maroto, EdD, MPH, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
During the school year, over 30 million children in the United States receive meals through school lunch programs. When the school year ends, food insecurity becomes more prevalent among school-aged children. The Summer Food Service Program and the Seamless Summer Option of the National School Lunch Program help alleviate the summer nutrition gap and make meals accessible to children over the summer months. Offering nutrition education and physical activities at summer meal sites may help increase summer meal participation, while teaching healthy behaviors. This session will highlight new formative research about summer meal programs and practical strategies for nutrition education.
Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to describe the USDA summer meal programs and best practices for meal service and nutrition education.
Participants will be able to discuss formative research findings regarding parents’ perceptions about their child’s eating and physical activity habits during the summer as compared to the school year.
Participants will be able to access free nutrition education resources for summer meal programs.
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

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Nutrition Literacy: Next Steps in Increasing Capacity with Nutrition Information
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Karen Chapman-Novakofski, PhD, RD, LDN, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana
Speakers: Heather Gibbs, PhD, RD, University of Kansas Medical Center; Karina Diaz Rios, PhD,University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, Merced
Americans are bombarded with often conflicting or confusing nutrition information, and many struggle with issues of health literacy. This session will explore the overlap of health and nutrition literacy research and provide educators with ideas and tools for communicating clearly with their audiences. Special emphasis will be placed upon the particular challenges and strategies for reaching Latino populations as well as discussion of a new assessment tool for measuring nutrition literacy.
Learning Objectives:
Discuss the challenges and consequences of health and nutrition literacy for English and/or Spanish speaking populations.
Examine a new tool that objectively measures nutrition literacy.
Identify best practices for communicating with audiences demonstrating low health and/or nutrition literacy.
Primary focus of session: Research, Research and Practice

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Virtual Realities and Digital Health Adaptive Technology for Nutrition and Physical Activity Education (NPAE) across the Life Span
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Nautilus 1, 2
Moderator: Siew Sun Wong, PhD, Oregon State University
Speakers: Melbourne Frank Hovell, PhD, MPH, San Diego State University; Jeanne Gleason, EdD, New Mexico State University; Joan Cowdery, PhD, Eastern Michigan University; Walter Greenleaf, PhD, Stanford University; Siew Sun Wong, PhD, Oregon State University
This session aims to raise awareness and boost understanding of how emerging innovations and applications of theoretical frameworks for behavior are used to engage and retain participants in Nutrition and Physical Activity Education (NPAE) that involve both the physical and virtual spaces. Learn how instructional design, media, virtual worlds, and virtual reality technologies are designed and applied to change health behaviors and reduce health disparities through innovative health communication modalities and behavior change strategies. Come hear the experts describe how existing and potential applications of virtual reality and digital health technology worldwide can improve NPAE across the life span.
Learning Objectives:
Learn how emerging changes in theories and frameworks are being used to engage and retain participants across the life span in NPAE that involve both the physical and virtual spaces.
Learn how instructional design, media, virtual worlds, and virtual reality technologies are designed to change health behaviors and eliminate health disparities through innovative health communication and behavior change strategies.
Describe the existing and potential applications of virtual reality and digital health technology to strengthen NPAE across the life span.
Primary focus of session: Technology/Marketing, General Professional Enrichment, Research and Practice

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Systems Behavior Change for School Environments: Taking Nutrition Education to the Next Level
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday 7/31, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California
Speaker: Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California; Heather Reed, MA, RDN, California Department of Education; Mary Ann Mills, UC CalFresh Nutrition Education
It’s not merely a “best practice” - it’s a movement that relies on innovation at the school level to promote a culture of wellness. Starting with a foundation of three organizations whose goals aligned, the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement of California collaborative launched a statewide initiative that integrated nutrition education with the cafeteria environment and wellness policies. Come hear how the real magic gets started when community partners inspire the creativity of school leaders to transform their environments. During this session harvest ideas for how you can develop a systems approach with your nutrition education initiatives.
Learning Objectives:
Consider how key partners at the state and local level collectively create a movement for systems behavior change in schools.
Synthesize ways to innovate nutrition education by integrating with wellness policy and the cafeteria environment to create a culture of wellness in schools.
Discover how California schools leverage Smarter Lunchrooms Movement to market their nutrition programs within their communities.
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Practice
Session funded by the California Department of Education, Dairy Council of California, and UC California Fresh Nutrition Education Program.

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Make Real Change: Nutrition Educators as Advocates
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday 7/31, Grand Ballroom C
Moderator: Claire Uno, MLIS Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy, Program in Nutrition, Teachers College, Columbia University
Speaker: Jennifer Folliard, MPH, RDN, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; Tracy Fox, MPH, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC; Melissa Maulding, MS, RD, Purdue University Extension; Alison Hard, Tisch Scholar, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education and Policy, Program in Nutrition, Teachers College, Columbia University
Nutrition education professionals are perfectly positioned to advocate for increased federal support for programs and research in the field. While advocacy can seem daunting and time-consuming, having a strong coalition can provide a framework for action and a stronger unified voice. This session will give participants familiarity with some of the major issues and legislation, highlight potential levers for change, and discuss how we could move forward together to promote nutrition education at the federal level.
Learning Objectives:
Participants will gain an understanding about policy issues relevant to nutrition education and opportunities to strengthen the field through advocacy (e.g. CNR, DGA, funding for nutrition education research through USDA/NIH/CDC)
Participants will learn the different ways to be an advocate, including through elected officials and executive branch agencies;
Participants will learn about and feel more confident to engage in different types of policy approaches, including drafting legislative language, policy papers, testimony, rulemaking comment letters, grassroots advocacy materials and visits with elected officials.
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Public Policy

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SNEB Awards Presentation and Business Meeting
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Sunday 7/31 Grand Ballroom AB
Celebrate the successes of SNEB over the past year and recognize this year’s award winners including the Helen Denning Ullrich Award for Lifetime Excellence in Nutrition Education, Mid Career Achievement Award, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award presented by the Higher Education Division, Program Impact and Research Awards. SNEB Foundation Scholarships and Higher Education Division Research Awards also presented.

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Sunday Night at the Movies!
“Well Fed? The Health and Environmental Implications of Our Food Choices”

5:30 - 7:30 p.m., Sunday 7/31 Grand Ballroom C
Moderators: Mary Murimi, PhD, RD, Texas Tech University; Chris Taylor, PhD, RDN, LD, FAND, Ohio State University; Samantha Ramsay, PhD, RDN, LD, University of Idaho
What better way to expand your thinking than through group discussion after watching select video segments about food choice behaviors and our nation’s health! Learn from each other as moderators pose thought stimulating questions and foster intriguing dialogue among attendees. This unique session will both challenge and stimulate your thinking in nutrition education.
Non-fat, low-fat, saturated fat, trans fats, healthy fats - in an era where we seem to be constantly bombarded with often conflicting messages about our diets, is all this information actually making us any healthier? How can we cut through media hysteria and make wise choices about the food we eat, and what impact do our consumption habits have, not just on our own health but that of the planet?
Presenters on the video: Professor Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford; Dr Tara Garnett, Principal Investigator, Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food; Professor Mike Rayner, Principal Investigator, Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food and Professor of Population Health, University of Oxford
Originally recorded November 2014 at Oxford Martin School, Oxford

 

Monday, August 1

Wake for the Walk…Rise for the Run… For Health, For Fun!! Fun Run benefitting the SNEB Foundation
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. | $10 registration includes t-shirt with registration before July 1
Milestone Running will be leading our 5k route for running or walking.

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George M. Briggs Nutrition Science Symposium - Update for Nutrition Educators: The Interactive Role of the Human Microbiome, Nutrition, and Health
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m., Monday 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Suzanne Piscopo, PhD, University of Malta
Speaker: Carolyn M. Slupsky, PhD, University of California, Davis
Current outcomes from research indicate that the gut microbiota may influence human metabolism. This session is designed to provide a background and overview of the current science focusing on the effect of diet on GI microbiota and the interactive role of GI microbiota and nutrition in chronic disease and health. The session will conclude with “what we do know” and current recommendations for consumers.
Learning Objectives
Participants will gain knowledge in the background of microbiota of the gut
Participants will gain knowledge on the effects of diet on GI microbia
Participants will gain knowledge on the role of GI microbiota and nutrition in chronic disease and health.
Primary focus of session: Research
Session sponsored by the SNEB Foundation

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Poster Abstracts & Exhibits Open
10:15 - 11:45 a.m., Monday 8/1, Pavilion
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Duplicate Yourself! (How to Reach 100,000+ People by Going Virtual with Your Demos)
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday 8/1, Grand Ballroom C
Moderator: Joanne Kinsey, MS, CFCS, CWWS, Rutgers Cooperative Extension
Speakers: Jesse Sharrard, BA, AST, Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank; Joanne Kinsey, MS, CFCS, CWWS, Rutgers Cooperative Extension; Alice Henneman, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension
Eating healthier can be a daunting road to travel. In this session, discover ways that you can apply marketing techniques and toward the glamorization of healthy alternatives, identify credible spokespeople to advance your healthy eating message, and take advantage of free social media tools that can be used to extend and enhance programmatic efforts when demonstrating healthy cooking techniques. Leave this session with a plan for developing your personalized cooking demonstration strategy that can increase the likelihood your clients are able to build and maintain healthy habits they enjoy.
Learning Objectives:
Participants will understand the direct connection between cooking skills and ability to follow dietary guidelines.
Session participants will be able to identify three methods of demonstrations using videos, online newsletter, or fact sheet (a method other than face-to-face) that can potentially be used when presenting cooking techniques to consumers/community.
Participants will observe and identify the differences that graphic design make in a recipe’s perceived appeal.
Primary focus of session: General Professional Enrichment, Practice
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Global Food Systems: Solutions for a Growing World
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Nautilus 1, 2,
Moderator: Seung-Yeon Lee, PhD, SNEB Division of International Nutrition and Education
Speakers: Andrew Jones, PhD, University of Michigan Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health; Angie (Anchi) Mei, AICP, MLA, MCP, International Rescue Committee; Rishi Kumar, The Growing Home
Nutrition professionals play a role in finding solutions to provide food that is safe and nutritionally sound for the growing population. This session will begin with an overview on food systems and how it impacts public health nutrition at both a regional and global level. Participants will learn the nutritional challenges in feeding a growing population and the health, economic and environmental impacts of our current food system. Speakers will share their approaches used to address the challenges faced in our global food system. A group discussion will follow that allows the audience to interact and brainstorm solutions together.
Learning Objectives:
Describe the potential implications of food systems in low-income countries, especially agricultural biodiversity, on the quality of diets and the nutritional status of vulnerable populations
Learn about the economic and environmental impacts of our current food system and explore local and sustainable approaches used to address these impacts for the benefit of our health.
Understand the importance of urban farms and gardens as connection points for children to have access to healthy foods and environments.
Primary focus of session: General Professional Enrichment, Public Policy, Research and Practice
Sponsored by the SNEB Public Health Nutrition Division and Division of International Nutrition and Education

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Making It Count: Get Online with a Multi-Faceted, Multilingual, Professional Development Program for School Nutrition Personnel
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Holly Alperin, EdM, MCHES, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Speakers: Lynne Ivers Thompson, MS, UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Catherine A. Wickham, MS, RD, CDN, UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program, University of Massachusetts Amherst
The Healthy Hunger-free Kids Act of 2010 set the framework for healthier school meals. New efforts have also been made to ensure accountability in operating child nutrition programs. This has opened the door for school nutrition personnel to seek professional development opportunities to address these changes as well as new USDA professional standards. Through this program participants will gain a deeper appreciation of the value of professional development. They will experience a selection of Making it Count’s multilingual videos, interactive online and site-based activities focusing on new meal requirements, accountability, and accessibility; and review resources (handouts, facilitator guides and more).
Learning Objectives:
Gain an appreciation of the value of personnel development and USDA professional standards for school nutrition professionals.
Increase knowledge of why Making it Count was developed to improve integrity of school nutrition programs.
Increase awareness of how Making it Count can be used as a multi-faceted, multilingual professional development program for all school nutrition personnel.
Primary focus of session: Food Service/School Food, General Professional Enrichment

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Debate: Weight as a Measure of Health vs. Health at Every Size Concepts
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Monday 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Speakers: Dr. Christopher D. Gardner, Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford Prevention Research Center; Dr. Glenn A. Gaesser, Director, Healthy Lifestyles Research Center at Arizona State University
Speakers will:
Describe their work on obesity and the strategies that they have used, detailing the elements that they found most important including their results.
Provide evidence based examples that show the relationship between weight status and health in a number of ways including its relationship with chronic diseases.
As a way of bridging both perspectives, provide a brief aspect of what they think is positive in the Health at Every Size concept.
In the conclusion, they will deliver a clear recommendation of the next practice in fight against obesity and where we need to improve in our practice, measurements, and conclusions. It is imperative that the attendees get clear recommendations of what has worked and where we need to be going in our practice if we want to make a dent in fight against obesity and related chronic diseases.

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MyPlate Promotion Campaign Leverages Key Messages from the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom C
Speaker: Mary McGrane, PhD, USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion
We all eat every day, but how can we help Americans make food decisions that are better for their health? CNPP will share messages gained from consumer insights and discuss how these findings are being used to more effectively reach the public with science-based nutrition messages.
Presenter will share strategies on how organizations, especially those that promote healthy eating messages and products, can use research based on the Dietary Guidelines to influence their audience’s behavior toward more healthful food decisions.
Learning Objectives:
Review key messages based on MyPlate consumer insights.
Identify how nutrition educators can leverage MyPlate Campaign to reach a variety of target audiences.
Examine how MyPlate nutrition messages can reach consumers through gamifcation technology.
Primary focus of this session is Practice.

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Childhood Obesity Prevention Research through a Community Context
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Nautilus 1-2
Moderator: Paula Peters, PhD, Research and Extensions, Family and Consumer Sciences, Kansas State University
Speakers: Abby Gold, PhD, MPH, RD, Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, North Dakota State University; Sandy Procter, PhD, RD, LD, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University; Carol Smathers, MS, MPH, Ohio State University Extension
Establishing a culture and environment of healthful eating and physical activity focused on preventing childhood obesity is best accomplished with an engaged community team who take action in multiple levels of the socio-ecological construct. Community and environmental assessments within rural, low-income communities provide a broad understanding of needs which in turn inform plans for improvement. Collectively identifying and evaluating resources, developing strong community coalitions and training community coaches to facilitate decision making, enhances community members’ enthusiasm to participate and contributes to success. Reliance on qualitative and quantitative data findings secures sustainability and future efforts.
Learning Objectives:
Determine whether a new Extension model will be identified as the next practice tool for preventing childhood obesity.
Characterize how to effectively increase capacity and engage communities to create and sustain a healthy environment for young children.
Define effective collaborations among 7 states with community coalitions and/or community coaches to achieve goals
Primary focus of session: Research, Research and Practice
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Scholarship of Teaching & Learning: Innovative Collaborative Learning Strategies for Nutrition Education
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Natalie K. Cooke, PhD, North Carolina State University
Speaker: Natalie K. Cooke, PhD, North Carolina State University; Karla Shelnut, PhD, RD, University of Florida; Marissa Burgermaster, PhD, MAED, Columbia University Medical Center; Amanda Peterson, BS, RDN & Virginia Carraway-Stage, PhD, RDN, LDN East Carolina University
Those teaching nutrition in higher education settings are often asked to produce scholarship while balancing a heavy teaching load. The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) session provides nutrition educators in higher education the opportunity to learn about research-based next practices that can be used to evaluate and improve student-learning outcomes, while producing research suitable for peer-reviewed publication. The focus of this session is to share creative collaborative learning strategies being used in undergraduate and graduate nutrition courses across the nation with an emphasis on topics related to technology, writing, and critical thinking.
Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to describe the concept of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).
Participants will be able to discuss creative approaches to collaborative learning in undergraduate/graduate nutrition courses with an emphasis on topics related to technology, writing, and critical thinking.
Participants will be able to identify next practices that they may be interested in applying in their classrooms to improve student-learning outcomes.
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

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Early Childhood and Beyond: CACFP Meal Patterns Final Rule, Best Practices, and Resources
7 - 8 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Alicia H White, MS, RD, Chief, Nutrition Education and Promotion Branch, Nutrition, Education, Training, and Technical Assistance Division
Speaker: Andrea L. Farmer, MS, RD, LD, Chief, Community Meals Branch, Policy and Program Development Division, USDA Food and Nutrition Service, Child Nutrition Programs; Cheryl Jackson Lewis, MPA, RD, LDN, Director, Nutrition, Education, Training, and Technical Assistance Division, USDA Food and Nutrition Service, Child Nutrition Programs
This session highlights the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Meal Patterns Final Rule that was released in April 2016 and represents the first major changes to meals and snacks since the Program’s inception in 1968. Under the new standards outlined in the rule, meals and snacks will include a greater variety of vegetables and fruit, more whole grains, and less added sugar and saturated fat, and child care sites will also receive increased support for breastfeeding. These new standards will help safeguard the health of infants and children early in their lives and improve the wellness of adults.
USDA will provide an overview of the requirements of the final rule and best practices, showcase training and nutrition education resources to support implementation the new meal standards, and discuss the value that nutrition educators and nutrition education experts can bring to facilities and institutions participating in CACFP. Findings from USDA’s formative research study on nutrition, physical activity, and electronic media use in CACFP will also be highlighted to show the challenges that providers face in implementing guidelines as well as their technical assistance needs.

 

Tuesday, August 2

 

Coffee And...Optimal Nutrition at First Bite: Identifying First Foods for Healthier Lifespans
7:00 to 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom C | Breakfast served | RSVP required although there is no cost - indicate your interest in attending on the conference registration form
Speaker: Julia Nordgren, MD, Pediatric Lipid Specialist, Palo Alto Medical Foundation
Nutrient density, texture/consistency and flavor profile are all important considerations when choosing first foods to feed infants and toddlers. Yet, these characteristics may not only be important during the first two years of life. Research shows, babies’ diets during the complementary and transitional feeding period may influence eating behaviors in early childhood and later in life. This session will explore the current science investigating optimal first foods to help ensure lifelong healthy eating habits, and provide recommendations on best practices for health professionals to follow when counseling clients and the public.
Learning Objectives:
Amplify science findings to help improve knowledge among health professionals and colleagues on best practices to follow when feeding infants and toddlers.
Counsel clients and the public on specific food combinations to ensure toddlers and infants are exposed to appropriate textures and flavors, and are meeting nutrient needs.
Create tools and tips to help caregivers choose optimal foods for their infants and/or toddlers to ensure they are building lifelong healthy eating habits.
SNEB/SNEBF gratefully acknowledges the underwriting of this activity provided by Hass Avocado Board. Acceptance of these resources does not imply endorsement of the donor or its mission, products, or services.

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Bee Marks Communication Symposium - Talk Is Cheap: How Can Nutrition Educators Lead Better Food Dialogue
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Nicole Turner-Ravana, MS., Strategic Nutrition Communications LLC
Speakers: Robert C. Post, Ph.D., MEd., MSc., Chobani, LLC; Tish Van Dyke, Edelman
Our food landscape reflects a bumpy terrain of debate around the “best” food choices. A variety of communicators are impacting consumer perceptions, values and demands for different foods and expanding the view of why people make the choices they do, whether science-based or not. This session will include a panel discussion around the challenges of compelling yet science-based nutrition communication strategies and include key skill building techniques for the next practice to be more effective as nutrition educators and more influential within your realm of food dialogue.
Learning Objectives:
Identify current communications influences on consumer/public perceptions and behaviors related to nutrition;
Utilize resources and strategies used in popular media to impact nutrition knowledge;
Demonstrate key skills and vocabulary that can help them be a more effective communicator within their work.
Session sponsored by the SNEB Foundation

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USDA NIFA-AFRI and Team Nutrition Poster Abstracts
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Pavilion

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Oral Abstract Presentations
10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB, Grand Ballroom C, Nautilus 1-2

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Calling parents and caregivers . . . Are you there? . . . Can you hear me?
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Leslie Cunningham-Sabo, PhD, RDN, Colorado State University
Speakers: Leslie Cunningham-Sabo PhD, RDN, Colorado State University; Kate Cronin, MPH, Dept of Family Medicine and Comm Health University of Wisconsin-Madison; Myles Faith, PhD, University of Buffalo-SUNY; Melissa Olfert, DrPH, MS, RDN, LD, West Virginia University; Lisa Franzen-Castle, PhD, RD, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Barbara Lohse, PhD, RD, Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition, Rochester Institute of Technology
Engaging adults in nutrition education that targets their children has been challenging and frustrating; sometimes sidelining anticipated outcomes. Experienced researchers and practitioners address this issue by discussing the use of social media and text messaging, and describing incentive delivery strategies and dosage options to enhance participation. Learners will be challenged to reconsider accepted practices and utilize new models in designing educational experiences for children that can drive parent/caregiver engagement.
Learning Objectives:
Describe and discuss social media, text messaging and the dyad model as strategies to engage parents of children in nutrition education programs
Examine the role of nutrition education of children in the context of strengthening family relationships
Develop ideas for engaging parents/caregivers based on experience from iCook and Fuel for Fun outcome assessments
Primary focus of session: Families, Research and Practice
Sponsored by Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition, Rochester Institute of Technology
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Food Insecurity: Double Burden of Malnutrition
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom C
Moderator: Kavitha Sankavaram, MS, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Speakers: Daniel Remley, MSPH, PhD, Ohio State University Extension; Stacia Nordin, BS, RD, Never Ending Food; Paige Harrigan, MS, Save the Children; Kavitha Sankavaram, MS, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Over 800-million people suffer from hunger and nearly two billion people from undernutrition/ underweight putting them at-risk for chronic diseases. This double-burden threatens the economies of countries due to increased healthcare costs associated with nutrition-related illnesses. To meet the challenge of providing nutrition guidance in a world where undernutrition and over nutrition co-exist, nutrition/healthcare professionals must understand the complex interplay of economic/social/environmental and behavioral factors that prevent people from consuming and fully benefiting from healthy diets. This session explores dual paradoxes of obesity/undernutrition and hunger and strategies to improve national and international nutrition programs addressing all forms of malnutrition.
Learning Objectives:
Explain the dual paradoxes of food insecurity related to obesity and hunger and its connection to health and environmental sustainability.
Learn about the Rainbow of Colors Choice Food Pantry Model and how it might impact dietary quality and food insecurity.
Understand processes, research efforts and approaches used to improve national and international agriculture nutrition programs and policies and identify strategies to address all forms of malnutrition.
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, General Professional
Enrichment, Public Policy, Research and Practice

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Cognitive Load and Neuro-Economics: Implications for Health Literacy and Nutrition Education Program Design
12:45 p.m. - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 1-2
Moderator: Alisha Farris, PhD, Virginia Tech
Speakers: George Davis, PhD, Virginia Tech; Elena Serrano, PhD, Virginia Tech
Cognitive load is determined by how much attention, focus, and concentration a decision requires. Neuroeconomics is a relatively new field of economics that combines methods and theories from neuroscience, psychology, economics, and computer science to better understand the process of decision-making and the resulting choices. The goal of this session is to provide participants with a foundation in these disciplines to help develop more effective programming. This session will provide an overview of cognitive load and neuro-economics as they apply to food choices and nutrition with opportunities for group discussion to consider applications within programs and also research initiatives.
Learning Objectives:
To understand the constructs of cognitive load and neuro-economics
To identify how cognitive load and neuro-economics help provide insight into food and nutrition choices, particularly among individuals with budget constraints, such as low-income individuals
To discuss strategies for addressing cognitive load and neuro-economics within nutrition education programs and research
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, General Professional Enrichment, Research and Practice

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Conversations with USDA
12:15- 1:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 5
Moderator: Mallory M. Koenings, PhD, RDN
Speakers: Denise Eblen, PhD; Dionne Toombs, PhD; Deirdra Chester, PhD, RDN; Jane Clary Loveless, PhD, RN, MS, MCHES; Helen Chipman, PhD, RD; Mallory M. Koenings, PhD, RDN
In an effort to ensure the continued high quality of NIFA’s Childhood Obesity Prevention programs, NIFA invites input on the scientific priorities for the Integrated Approaches to Prevent Childhood Obesity programs. These programs are fully integrated, coordinating research, education, and extension efforts to combat the challenge of childhood obesity. We will consider comments when we develop future Childhood Obesity Prevention RFAs.
This is an opportunity to express your view point, reactions, and concerns as a stakeholder of the AFRI competitive grants program and provide feedback on current program areas as well as your vision for future nutrition research, education, and extension programs.

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USDA Funding Opportunities in Nutrition Research, Education, and Extension
1:00 - 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 5
Moderator: Marly Diallo
Speakers: Deirdra Chester, PhD, RDN; Jane Clary Loveless, PhD, RN, MS, MCHES; Helen Chipman, PhD, RD; Cheryl Jackson Lewis, MPA, RD, LDN; Mallory M. Koenings, PhD, RDN
This session will provide an overview of USDA nutrition research and programs to SNEB conference participants. USDA will share information on research and programs. Following the speakers’ presentations an interactive discussion will provide an opportunity to share knowledge with SNEB conference participants and strengthen collaboration with USDA partners.
This session will help you identify the differences between USDA research and programs of the AFRI Childhood Obesity Prevention, Function and Efficacy of Nutrients, Community Food Projects, Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive, Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program, Food & Nutrition Service, Small Business Innovation Research, and Training & Fellowships.

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Advisory Committee on Public Policy Plenary Session - What’s on the Menu? Federal Policy Implications and Community Solutions Resulting From National Menu Labeling Requirements
2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Speakers: Margo Wootan, D.Sc., Center for Science in the Public Interest; Megan Mueller, MPH, Tufts University; Pam Smith, RD; Missy S. Nelson, RD, Taco Bell
This session will highlight how new national menu labeling requirements will affect nutrition information available in various settings. Speakers will discuss the implementation process across settings, the importance of this national public health policy and why nutrition education is a key variable in this policy’s ultimate success in driving healthier habits. Community and private sector initiatives will be shared, in addition to research around purchasing behavior and habits.
Learning objectives:
Understand implications of national menu labeling policy and critical role that nutrition education in its overall success
Gain knowledge of Childhood Obesity 180 menu labeling initiative
Learn how a leading food company has implemented menu labeling in a chain restaurant

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Initial Results from the Northeast Regional Nutrition Education Center of Excellence
(NE-RNECE) Research: Examining the Additive Effect of Direct Nutrition Education and Policy, Systems, and Environmental Changes to Prevent Obesity

4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom C
Moderator: Jamie Dollahite, PhD, Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences
Speakers: Grace Damio, MS, Hispanic Health Council; Joel Gittelsohn, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health; Mira Mehta, PhD, University of Maryland Extension, Department of Nutrition and Food Science; Geoffrey Greene, PhD, University of Rhode Island, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Tisa Fontaine Hill, MPH, Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences; Sofia Segura-Perez, MS, RD, Hispanic Health Council
Results from 5 research projects funded by the NE-RNECE will be presented. Projects are designed to build the evidence-base for the additive/synergistic effects of direct nutrition education and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) efforts conducted by EFNEP and/or SNAP-Ed by addressing one over-arching research question: Are PSE approaches combined with direct education more effective for obesity prevention than either approach alone? Research settings are in 4 states across the northeastern US, range from farmer’s markets to healthcare providers to schools, and include diverse low-income populations, e.g. urban Hispanic families, rural white adults, and urban African-American youth.
Learning Objectives:
Describe 5 research studies designed to assess the impact of combined PSE and nutrition education approaches conducted by EFNEP and/`or SNAP-Ed implementing agencies in a variety of settings and with diverse populations.
Explore initial outcome and process evaluation results from these studies conducted in 4 states across the northeast region of the US.
Learn how ongoing nutrition education programming was leveraged to engage in research designed to build the evidence base for effective programs.
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Research

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USDA Highlights from the NIFA Childhood Obesity Prevention Program
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 5
Moderators: Deirdra N. Chester, PhD, RDN; Mallory M. Koenings, PhD, RDN, National Institute of Food and Agriculture United States Department of Agriculture Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition
Speakers: Janice Emerson, PhD, Tennessee State University; Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, PhD, RD, FAND, Rutgers University; Sharon Donovan, PhD, RD, University of Illinois; Marian Fitzgibbon, PhD, University of Illinois at Chicago; Sheryl Hughes, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine; Deborah John, PhD, Oregon State University; Julie Lumeng, MD, University of Michigan; Jessica Meendering, PhD, EP-C, South Dakota State University
This session will provide highlights from the research portfolio of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) competitive grants program – Childhood Obesity Prevention.
Learning Objectives:
1. Articulate new knowledge of behavioral, social, cultural and/or environmental factors that influence childhood obesity.
2. Describe the impacts of family, peer, community and/or school based interventions for preventing childhood obesity.

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HomeStyles: A Case Study in Developing a Childhood-Obesity Prevention Intervention
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 1-2
Moderator: Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, PhD, RD, FAND, Rutgers University
Speakers: Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, PhD, RD, FAND, Rutgers University; Jennifer Martin-Biggers, MS, RD, Rutgers University
The theory-driven HomeStyles intervention enables and motivates parents to shape their home environment and lifestyle behavioral practices (diet, exercise, sleep) using quick, easy, no-cost strategies to prevent excessive weight gain in their preschool children (ages 2-5 years). The session will elucidate the develop and implement HomeStyles, starting from conceptualization to implementation of randomized controlled trial, using best practices identified in the research literature and by guidance from a panel of experts in health behavior change, nutrition, physical activity, child development, parenting and adult education, including motivational interviewing, healthy behavior change theory, and community based participatory research principles.
Learning Objectives:
Describe best practices for developing childhood obesity prevention interventions targeting home environments and lifestyle practices.
Summarize the importance of using social ecological model, social cognitive theory constructs, adult learning theory, community based participatory research, and motivational interviewing to guide intervention development.
Create and implement interventions using best practices.
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice
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SNAP to it! Collaborating to Enhance School Wellness Policies
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Moderator: Cheryl Jackson Lewis, MPA, RD, LDN, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
Speakers: Erika Pijai, MS, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service; Andy (Riesenberg) Naja-Riese, MSPH, USDA Food and Nutrition Services Western Regional Office; Heather Reed, MA, RDN, California Department of Education; Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California; Kate McDevitt, UC San Diego School Of Medicine, Center for Community Health
Local school wellness policies (LWP) are an important tool for establishing healthy school environments. Schools are encouraged to include SNAP-Education coordinators and educators on LWP committees. State and local partnerships that include SNAP-Ed providers expand the scope of activities conducted in school settings using policy, system, and environmental change (PSE) efforts. Hear directly from USDA about the new regulation on LWP requirements, useful tools and resources, as well as best practices from state agencies and schools that have leveraged SNAP-Ed partnerships to successfully implement and evaluate LWP. Get involved to enhance your wellness policy and create systems-level changes!
Learning Objectives:
Discuss new requirements for local school wellness policies as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and the new Federal regulation.
Identify examples of policy, system, and environmental change efforts in school settings, consistent with SNAP-Ed guidance
Access and use technical assistance tools and resources in creating a healthier school environment.
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Practice


Wednesday, August 3 - Post Conference

 

Developing and Promoting Sustainable Dietary Guidance
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Wednesday, 8/3, Grand Balllroom C
Cost: $75 per person/ Breakfast included
Moderator: Justin Fast, SNEB Division of Sustainable Food Systems
Speakers: Hugh Joseph, PhD, Tufts University, Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy; Jennifer L. Wilkins, PhD, RD, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics; Syracuse University.
With SNEB now developing a position paper concerning sustainability, this is the perfect time to reflect on ‘sustainable diets’, a term introduced by Joan Gussow & Kate Clancy in ‘Dietary Guidelines for Sustainability’ (JNE, 1986). It took until 2015 before a serious effort was made (but ultimately rejected) to include sustainability in the 2016 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA).
Recent years have seen the emergence of several sustainable dietary guidelines, issued primarily by NGOs. However, many were based on limited evidence and omitted issues such as climate change, biodiversity and food security. Their development often reflected a lack of expertise relative to what goes into producing the DGA, resulting in weaker scientific standards of evidence. This suggests that intermediary roles for qualified professionals can be important to the guidance development process and to the integrity of guidelines. ‘Tufts Sustainable Diets Project’ (TSDP) is designing a framework to facilitate development of rigorously-designed sustainable dietary guidance that involves roles for professional intermediaries.
This workshop will address sustainable diets and associated guidelines development. We will initially explore key elements of sustainable diets and their connections to food systems. Participants will then be led through a decision-making exercise to navigate the links among global systems, food systems, and diets from sustainability approaches. Finally, we will address together the potential for DSFS members to develop a set of sustainable dietary guidelines, in sync with the emerging TSDP Framework protocols. If supported, an initial one-year action plan will be a key outcome of this workshop.
Primary focus of session: Research and Practice

 

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Integrating Movement into Nutrition and Gardening for Nutrition Education
9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, 8/3, Nautilus 1-2 | Price: $35
Speakers: Carol R. Miller, RD, M.Ed, LDN, University of Maryland Extension, Food Supplement Nutrition Education; Jane Kostenko, M.Ed, BS, BA, University of Maryland Extension, Food Supplement Nutrition Education
Are you looking for ways to add movement to your students’ nutrition and gardening for nutrition lessons? Participants attending this interactive session will learn about the science supporting physical activity and classroom movement, discuss examples of how to engage youth in movement and identify opportunities to integrate movement in their nutrition education teaching. Lessons will be demonstrated using Maryland SNAP-Ed resources for elementary aged youth.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this session, participants will be able to describe the difference between physical activity and movement and explain at least two benefits from incorporating either into nutrition and gardening education.
By the end of the session, the participants will be able to provide a minimum of three specific lesson-related nutrition and/or gardening movement examples they can implement with their students.
By the end of the session, participants will be able to reference resources available to nutrition educators to integrate movement in their nutrition and gardening for nutrition lessons.

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Tour to Coastal Roots Farm: Nourishing Connections
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, 8/3, Offsite | Registration Required | $75 per person - transportation and lunch included
As access to fresh fruits and vegetables becomes more challenging, particularly in urban areas, community gardens are increasingly important. Jewish community farms are a fast-growing segment of community farms that seek to cultivate more than just produce.
Learning Objectives:
Visit Coastal Roots Farm, established in response to Encinitas, CA residents’ interest in sustainability, the Jewish community, social justice, and to the high number of low-income households currently lacking regular access to fresh, healthy food.
Understand the way a nonprofit community farm and education center can nourish connections—to individuals, their neighbors, and the land.
Become familiar with the Jewish wisdom and centuries-old agricultural traditions that contribute to the success of Coastal Roots Farm.
Coastal Roots Farm is part of a growing movement of Jewish community farms around the country with the goal of becoming a model for community farming and creative Jewish expression, both at home in Encinitas, California, and around the world. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about the philosophies and practices behind these unique community gardens.


 

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SNEB is an international community of professionals actively involved in nutrition education and health promotion. Their work takes place in colleges and universities, government agencies, cooperative extension, communications and public relations firms, the food industry, voluntary and service organizations and with other reliable places of nutrition and health education information.