SNEB Annual Conference
Programs

Below is a tentative schedule of programs for the 2016 Annual Conference... watch for more details

 

Pre-Conference Session sponsored by the Food and Nutrition Extension Education and Public Health Divisions
8 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturday, 7/30 | Costs to be determine | Lunch included
"Using Policy Systems and Environmental Change (PSE) Interventions to Build Healthy Communities"
Nutrition educators are working in communities to positively impact the way people live, learn, work, and play by making healthy choices easy, safe, and affordable. This preconference focuses identifying evidence-based policy, systems and environmental change interventions in nutrition education.  Through interactive sessions, participants will have an opportunity to connect current practices and explore multiple interventions that create and encourage healthy behaviors in communities.
Learning Objectives:
1. Define terms and the framework for PSE work in nutrition education
2. Identify evidence based strategies for PSE in nutrition education
3. Explore and apply PSE strategies through case studies
Moderator: Karen Barale, MS, RD, CD, Washington State University Extension
Speaker: Carol Smathers, MS, MPH, The Ohio State University; Jenny Lobb, MPH, RD, LD, The Ohio State University; Michelle Brill, MPH, Rutgers University; Cindy DeBlauw, MS, RD, University of Missouri Extension; Gail Feenstra, PhD, University of California, Davis; Deborah John, PhD, Oregon State University
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

 

JNEB Pre-conference Workshop: How to Conduct and Write Systematic Reviews for JNEB

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. | Saturday, 7/30 |Reservation required - cost to be determined

Speakers: Julie Reeder, PhD, MPH, CHES, State of Oregon WIC Program; Marla Reicks, PhD, RD, University of Minnesota; Megan Kocher, MLIS, University of Minnesota Libraries, and George Woodward, Publisher, Elsevier.

Participants will actively engage in the steps of a systematic review process in a group-supported setting using a pre-selected topic of their choosing. After the workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Clearly differentiate a systematic review from other literature review approaches.  
  2. Perfect the problem statement, one of the key steps to a successful systematic review.
  3. More effectively identify and collaborate with a research librarian/information specialist to increase the efficiency of the search process.
  4. Critically evaluate search results.
  5. Craft a succinct yet comprehensive report of review findings.
  6. Market the systematic review after publication.

The presenters will go through their own systematic review process in preparation for the workshop so they can candidly share their own experiences and how they dealt with or avoided the common pitfalls that come with conducting a review. Participants will be expected to complete a brief homework assignment prior to attending to optimize learning experiences during the workshop.


Successes and Challenges in Child Nutrition and Opportunities for Nutrition Educators
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Grand Ballroom C
Much has changed in the school nutrition environment over the past five years. Research indicates that school nutrition is a substantial contributor to student health and wellness. Join leaders from the Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project (a joint initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) as they discuss the latest about what progress has been made, challenges that remain, and opportunities for nutrition educators to get involved in supporting further progress in child nutrition at the local, state, and federal level.
Learning Objectives:
1. Describe three significant recent achievements in child nutrition.
2. Discuss three research-based challenges faced by school nutrition programs and opportunities for overcoming them.
3. Identify three ways nutrition educators can get involved in supporting further progress in child nutrition at the local, state, or federal level.
Moderator: Tracy Fox, MPH, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC
Speaker: Jessica Donze Black, RD, MPH, The Pew Charitable Trusts; Stephanie Scarmo, PhD, MPH, The Pew Charitable Trusts
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Public Policy

 

Summer Moves, Summer Food: Helping Kids Stay Healthy When School is Out
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Nautilus 1-2
During the school year, over 30 million children in the United States receive meals through school lunch programs. When the school year ends, food insecurity becomes more prevalent among school-aged children. The Summer Food Service Program and the Seamless Summer Option of the National School Lunch Program help alleviate the summer nutrition gap and make meals accessible to children over the summer months.  Offering nutrition education and physical activities at summer meal sites may help increase summer meal participation, while teaching healthy behaviors. This session will highlight new formative research about summer meal programs and practical strategies for nutrition education.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to describe the USDA summer meal programs and best practices for meal service and nutrition education.
2. Participants will be able to discuss formative research findings regarding parents’ perceptions about their child’s eating and physical activity habits during the summer as compared to the school year.
3. Participants will be able to access free nutrition education resources for summer meal programs.
Moderator: Maya Maroto, EdD, MPH, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
Speaker: Alicia White, USDA Food and Nutrition Service; Brock Smith, SMS, Vista Unified School District; Maya Maroto, EdD, MPH, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
Sponsored by: A sponsor has been contacted and agreed to the amount stated below
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

 

Nutrition Literacy: Next Steps in Increasing Capacity with Nutrition Information
12:45 - 1:45 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Grand Ballroom AB
Americans are bombarded with often conflicting or confusing nutrition information, and many struggle with issues of health literacy. This session will explore the overlap of health and nutrition literacy research and provide educators with ideas and tools for communicating clearly with their audiences. Special emphasis will be placed upon the particular challenges and strategies for reaching Latino populations as well as discussion of a new assessment tool for measuring nutrition literacy.
Learning Objectives:
1. Discuss the challenges and consequences of health and nutrition literacy for English and/or Spanish speaking populations.
2. Examine a new tool that objectively measures nutrition literacy.
3. Identify best practices for communicating with audiences demonstrating low health and/or nutrition literacy.
Moderator: Karen Chapman-Novakofski, PhD, RD, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana
Speaker: Heather Gibbs, PhD, RD, University of Kansas Medical Center; Karina Diaz Rios, PhD, University of California, Merced
Primary focus of session: Research, Research and Practice

 

Cognitive Load and Neuro-Economics: Implications for Health Literacy and Nutrition Education Program Design
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Nautilus 1-2
Cognitive load is determined by how much attention, focus, and concentration a decision requires.  Neuroeconomics is a relatively new field of economics that combines methods and theories from neuroscience, psychology, economics, and computer science to better understand the process of decision-making and the resulting choices. The goal of this session is to provide participants with a foundation in these disciplines to help develop more effective programming. This session will provide an overview of cognitive load and neuro-economics as they apply to food choices and nutrition with opportunities for group discussion to consider applications within programs and also research initiatives.
Learning Objectives:
1. To understand the constructs of cognitive load and neuro-economics
2. To identify how cognitive load and neuro-economics help provide insight into food and nutrition choices, particularly among individuals with budget constraints, such as low-income individuals
3. To discuss strategies for addressing cognitive load and neuro-economics within nutrition education programs and research
Moderator: Alisha Farris, PhD, Virginia Tech
Speaker: George Davis, Virginia Tech; Elena Serrano, Virginia Tech
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, General Professional Enrichment,Research and Practice

 

Systems Behavior Change for School Environments: Taking NutritionEducation to the Next Level
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Grand Ballroom AB
It’s not merely a “best practice” - it’s a movement that relies on innovation at the school level to promote a culture of wellness. Starting with a foundation of three organizations whose goals aligned, the Smarter Lunchrooms Movement of California collaborative launched a statewide initiative that integrated nutrition education with the cafeteria environment and wellness policies. Come hear how the real magic gets started when community partners inspire the creativity of school leaders to transform their environments. During this session harvest ideas for how you can develop a systems approach with your nutrition education initiatives.
Learning Objectives:
1. Consider how key partners at the state and local level collectively create a movement for systems behavior change in schools.
2. Synthesize ways to innovate nutrition education by integrating with wellness policy and the cafeteria environment to create a culture of wellness in schools.
3. Discover how California schools leverage Smarter Lunchrooms Movement to market their nutrition programs within their communities.
Moderator: Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California
Speaker: Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California; Heather Reed, MA, RDN, California Department of Education; Mary Ann Mills, UC CalFresh Nutrition Education
Sponsored by: A sponsor has been contacted and agreed to the amount stated below
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Practice

 

Make Real Change: Nutrition Educators as Advocates
2:30 - 4:00 p.m., Sunday, 7/31, Grand Ballroom C
Nutrition education professionals are perfectly positioned to advocate for increased federal support for programs and research in the field. While advocacy can seem daunting and time-consuming, having a strong coalition can provide a framework for action and a stronger unified voice. This session will give participants familiarity with some of the major issues and legislation, highlight potential levers for change, and discuss how we could move forward together to promote nutrition education at the federal level.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will gain an understanding about policy issues relevant to nutrition education and opportunities to strengthen the field through advocacy (e.g. CNR, DGA, funding for nutrition education research through USDA/NIH/CDC)
2. Participants will learn the different ways to be an advocate, including through elected officials and executive branch agencies;
3. Participants will learn about and feel more confident to engage in different types of policy approaches, including drafting legislative language, policy papers, testimony, rulemaking comment letters, grassroots advocacy materials and visits with elected officials.
Moderator: Tracy Fox, MPH, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC
Speaker: Claire Uno, MLIS, Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy, Teachers College, Columbia University; Jennifer Folliard, MPH, RDN, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; Tracy Fox, MPH, RD, Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants, LLC; Melissa Maulding, MS, RD, Purdue University Extension
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Public Policy

 

Chef-Based Nutrition Marketing: Influencing Nutritional Behaviors through Graphic Design & Love of Food
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Nautilus 1-2
Most people understand that the shortest path between them and better health is through eating more whole grains and fresh fruits & vegetables.  However, that can be a daunting road for many people to follow, let alone enjoy traveling. In this session, discover ways that you can apply marketing techniques and graphic design elements toward the promotion of healthy alternatives and identify credible spokespeople to advance your healthy eating message through star power and celebrity endorsement. See and experience the difference design can make to a recipe’s appeal.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will identify the direct connection between cooking skills and ability to follow dietary guidelines
2. Participants will identify the differences that graphic design make in a recipe's perceived appeal
3. Participants will identify ways to market their nutrition education initiatives through application of basic graphic design principles.
Moderator: Song Xiong, RD {Tentative}, SNEB Communications Division
Speaker: Jesse Sharrard, BA, AST, Greater Pittsburgh Community F
Primary focus of session: Technology/Marketing, General Professional Enrichment,Practice

 

Global Food Systems: Solutions for the growing world
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom C
Nutrition professionals play a role in finding solutions to provide food that is safe and nutritionally sound for the growing population. This session will begin with an overview on food systems and how it impacts public health nutrition at both a regional and global level.  Participants will learn the nutritional challenges in feeding a growing population and the health, economic and environmental impacts of our current food system.  Speakers will share their approaches used to address the challenges faced in our global food system.  A group discussion will follow that allows the audience to interact and brainstorm solutions together.
Learning Objectives:
1. Describe the potential implications of food systems in low-income countries, especially agricultural biodiversity, on the quality of diets and the nutritional status of vulnerable populations
2. Learn about the economic and environmental impacts of our current food system and explore local and sustainable approaches used to address these impacts for the benefit of our health.
3. Understand the importance of urban farms and gardens as connection points for children to have access to healthy foods and environments.
Moderator: Seung-Yeon Lee, PhD, SNEB Division of International Nutrition and Education
Speaker: Andrew Jones, PhD, University of Michigan, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health; Angie (Anchi) Mei, AICP, MLA, MCP, Senior Program Manager, Food Security and Community Health Department, International Rescue Committee; Rishi Kumar, Founder & Director, The Growing Home; Seung-Yeon Lee, PhD, University of Cinncinati
Primary focus of session: Other, General Professional Enrichment,Public Policy,Research and Practice

 

Making It Count:  Get Online with a Multi-Faceted, Multilingual, Professional Development Program for School Nutrition Personnel
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
The Healthy Hunger-free Kids Act of 2010 set the framework for healthier school meals. New efforts have also been made to ensure accountability in operating child nutrition programs. This has opened the door for school nutrition personnel to seek professional development opportunities to address these changes as well as new USDA professional standards.  Through this program participants will gain a deeper appreciation of the value of professional development.  They will experience a selection of Making it Count’s multilingual videos, interactive online and site-based activities focusing on new meal requirements, accountability, and accessibility; and review resources (handouts, facilitator guides and more).
Learning Objectives:
1. Gain an appreciation of the value of personnel development and USDA professional standards for school nutrition professionals.
2. Increase knowledge of why Making it Count was developed to improve integrity of school nutrition programs.
3. Increase awareness of how Making it Count can be used as a multi-faceted, multilingual professional development program for all school nutrition personnel.
Moderator: Lisa Lao, MS, RD, LDN, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Speaker: Lisa Lao, MS, RD, LDN, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education; Lynne Ivers Thompson, MS, UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Catherine A. Wickham, MS, RD, CDN, UMass Extension Nutrition Education Program, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Primary focus of session: Food Service/School Food, General Professional Enrichment

 

Childhood Obesity Prevention Research through a Community Context
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Nautilus 1-2
Establishing a culture and environment of healthful eating and physical activity focused on preventing childhood obesity is best accomplished with an engaged community team who take action in multiple levels of the socio-ecological construct. Community and environmental assessments within rural, low-income communities provide a broad understanding of needs which in turn inform plans for improvement. Collectively identifying and evaluating resources, developing strong community coalitions and training community coaches to facilitate decision making, enhances community members’ enthusiasm to participate and contributes to success. Reliance on qualitative and quantitative data findings secures sustainability and future efforts.
Learning Objectives:
1. Determine whether a new Extension model will be identified as the next practice tool for preventing childhood obesity.
2. Characterize how to effectively increase capacity and engage communities to create and sustain a healthy environment for young children.
3. Define effective collaborations among 7 states with community coalitions and/or community coaches to achieve goals
Moderator: Valentina M. Remig, PhD, Kansas State University, Research & Extension
Speaker: Paula Peters, PhD, Kansas State University; Abby Gold, PhD, MPH, RD, Department of Public Health, College of Health Professions, North Dakota State University; Sandy Procter, PhD, RD, LD, Department of Human Nutrition, Kansas State University; Amy R. Mobley, PhD, RD, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut
Primary focus of session: Research, Research and Practice

 

Scholarship of Teaching & Learning: Innovative Collaborative Learning Strategies for Nutrition Education
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Monday, 8/1, Grand Ballroom AB
Those teaching nutrition in higher education settings are often asked to produce scholarship while balancing a heavy teaching load. The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) session provides nutrition educators in higher education the opportunity to learn about research-based next practices that can be used to evaluate and improve student-learning outcomes, while producing research suitable for peer-reviewed publication. The focus of this session is to share creative collaborative learning strategies being used in undergraduate and graduate nutrition courses across the nation with an emphasis on topics related to technology, writing, and critical thinking.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to describe the concept of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).
2. Participants will be able to discuss creative approaches to collaborative learning in undergraduate/graduate nutrition courses with an emphasis on topics related to technology, writing, and critical thinking.
3. Participants will be able to identify next practices that they may be interested in applying in their classrooms to improve student-learning outcomes.
Moderator: Virginia Carraway-Stage, PhD, RDN, LDN, East Carolina University
Speaker: Natalie K. Cooke, PhD, North Carolina State University; Karla Shelnut, PhD, RD, Florida State University; Marissa Burgermaster, PhD, MAED, Columbia University Medical Center; Virginia Carraway-Stage, PhD, RDN, LDN, East Carolina University
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

 

Calling parents and caregivers . . . Are you there? . . . Can you hear me?
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Engaging adults in nutrition education that targets their children has been challenging and frustrating; sometimes sidelining anticipated outcomes.  Experienced researchers and practitioners address this issue by discussing the use of social media and text messaging, and describing incentive delivery strategies and dosage options to enhance participation.  Learners will be challenged  to reconsider accepted practices and utilize new models in designing educational experiences for children that can drive parent/caregiver engagement.
Learning Objectives:
1. Describe and discuss social media, text messaging and the dyad model as strategies to engage parents of children in nutrition education programs
2. Examine the role of nutrition education of children in the context of strengthening family relationships
3. Develop ideas for engaging parents/caregivers based on experience from iCook and Fuel for Fun outcome assessments
Moderator: Leslie Cunningham-Sabo, PhD, RDN, Colorado State University
Speaker: Leslie Cunningham-Sabo PhD, RDN, Colorado State University; Kate Cronin, MPH, Dept of Family Medicine and Comm Health University of Wisconsin-Madison; Melissa Olfert, DrPH, MS, RDN, LD, West Virginia University; Lisa Franzen-Castle, PhD, RD, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Myles Faith, PhD, University of Buffalo-SUNY; Barbara Lohse, PhD, RD, Wegmans School of Health and Nutrition, Rochester Institute of Technology
Sponsored by: A sponsor has been contacted and agreed to the amount stated below
Primary focus of session: Families, Research and Practice

 

Virtual Realities and Digital Health Adaptive Technology for Nutrition and Physical Activity Education (NPAE) across the Life Span
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 1, 2
This session aims to raise awareness and boost understanding of how emerging innovations and applications of theoretical frameworks for behavior are used to engage and retain participants in Nutrition and Physical Activity Education (NPAE) that involve both the physical and virtual spaces.  Learn how instructional design, media, virtual worlds, and virtual reality technologies are designed and applied to change health behaviors and reduce health disparities through innovative health communication modalities and behavior change strategies.  Come hear the experts describe how existing and potential applications of virtual reality and digital health technology worldwide can improve NPAE across the life span.
Learning Objectives:
1. Learn how emerging changes in theories and frameworks are being used to engage and retain participants across the life span in NPAE that involve both the physical and virtual spaces.
2. Learn how instructional design, media, virtual worlds, and virtual reality technologies are designed to change health behaviors and eliminate health disparities through innovative health communication and behavior change strategies.
3. Describe the existing and potential applications of virtual reality and digital health technology to strengthen NPAE across the life span.
Moderator: Siew Sun Wong, PhD, Oregon State University
Speaker: Melbourne Frank Hovell, PhD, MPH, San Diego State University; Jeanne Gleason, EdD, New Mexico State University; Joan Cowdery, PhD, Eastern Michigan University; Walter Greenleaf, PhD, Stanford University; Siew Sun Wong, PhD, Oregon State University
Primary focus of session: Technology/Marketing, General Professional Enrichment,Research and Practice

 

Food Insecurity: Double Burden of Malnutrition
12:45 - 2:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom C
Over 800-million people suffer from hunger and nearly two billion people from undernutrition/overweight putting them at-risk for chronic diseases. This double-burden threatens the economies of countries due to increased healthcare costs associated with nutrition-related illnesses. To meet the challenge of providing nutrition guidance in a world where undernutrition and over nutrition co-exist, nutrition/healthcare professionals must understand the complex interplay of economic/social/environmental and behavioral factors that prevent people from consuming and fully benefiting from healthy diets. This session explores dual paradoxes of obesity/undernutrition and hunger and strategies to improve national and international nutrition programs addressing all forms of malnutrition.
Learning Objectives:
1. Explain the dual paradoxes of food insecurity related to obesity and hunger and its connection to health and environmental sustainability.
2. Learn about the Rainbow of Colors Choice Food Pantry Model and how it might impact dietary quality and food insecurity.
3. Understand processes, research efforts and approaches used to improve national and international agriculture nutrition programs and policies and identify strategies to address all forms of malnutrition.
Moderator: Kavitha Sankavaram, MS, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Speaker: Daniel Remley, MSPH, PhD, Ohio State University Extension; Stacia Nordin, RD, Never Ending Food; Paige Harrigan, MS, Save the Children; Ana Carla Cepeda López MD MSc PhD, University of Monterrey; Kavitha Sankavaram, MS, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, General Professional Enrichment,Public Policy,Research and Practice

 

Initial Results from the Northeast Regional Nutrition Education Center of Excellence (NE-RNECE) Research: Examining the Additive Effect of Direct Nutrition Education and Policy, Systems, and Environmental Changes to Prevent Obesity
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom C
Results from 5 research projects funded by the NE-RNECE will be presented.  Projects are designed to build the evidence-base for the additive/synergistic effects of direct nutrition education and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) efforts conducted by EFNEP and/or SNAP-Ed by addressing one over-arching research question: Are PSE approaches combined with direct education more effective for obesity prevention than either approach alone? Research settings are in 4 states across the northeastern US, range from farmer’s markets to healthcare providers to schools, and include diverse low-income populations, e.g. urban Hispanic families, rural white adults, and urban African-American youth.
Learning Objectives:
1. Describe 5 research studies designed to assess the impact of combined PSE and nutrition education approaches conducted by EFNEP and/`or SNAP-Ed implementing agencies in a variety of settings and with diverse populations.
2. Explore initial outcome and process evaluation results from these studies conducted in 4 states across the northeast region of the US.
3. Learn how ongoing nutrition education programming was leveraged to engage in research designed to build the evidence base for effective programs.
Moderator: Jamie Dollahite, PhD, Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences
Speaker: Grace Damio, MS, Hispanic Health Council; Joel Gittelsohn, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health; Mira Mehta, PhD, University of Maryland Extension, Department of Nutrition and Food Science; Geoffrey Greene, PhD, University of Rhode Island, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Tisa Fontaine Hill, MPH, Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences
Primary focus of session: Policy and Practice, Research

 

HomeStyles: A Case Study in Developing a Childhood-Obesity Prevention Intervention
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Nautilus 1-2
The theory-driven HomeStyles intervention enables and motivates parents to shape their home environment and lifestyle behavioral practices (diet, exercise, sleep) using quick, easy, no-cost strategies to prevent excessive weight gain in their preschool children (ages 2-5 years).  The session will  elucidate the develop and implement HomeStyles, starting from conceptualization to implementation of randomized controlled trial, using best practices identified in the research literature and by guidance from a panel of experts in health behavior change, nutrition, physical activity, child development, parenting and adult education, including motivational interviewing, healthy behavior change theory, and community based participatory research principles.
Learning Objectives:
1.  Describe best practices for developing childhood obesity prevention interventions targeting home environments and lifestyle practices.
2.  Summarize the importance of using social ecological model, social cognitive theory constructs, adult learning theory, community based participatory research, and motivational interviewing to guide intervention development.
3.  Create and implement interventions using best practices.
Moderator: Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, PhD, RD, FAND, Rutgers University
Speaker: Carol Byrd-Bredbenner, PhD, RD, FAND, Rutgers University; Jennifer Martin-Biggers, MS, RD, Rutgers University
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Research and Practice

 

SNAP to it! Collaborating to Enhance School Wellness Policies
4:15 - 5:15 p.m., Tuesday, 8/2, Grand Ballroom AB
Local wellness policies (LWP) are an important tool for establishing healthy school environments.  Schools are encouraged to include SNAP-Education coordinators and educators on LWP committees.  State and local partnerships that include SNAP-Ed providers expand the scope of activities conducted in school settings using policy, system, and environmental change (PSE) efforts.  Hear directly from USDA about the new regulation on LWP requirements, useful tools and resources, as well as best practices from state agencies and schools that have leveraged SNAP-Ed partnerships to successfully implement LWP.  Get involved to enhance your wellness policy and create systems-level changes!
Learning Objectives:
1. Discuss new requirements for local school wellness policies as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and the new Federal regulation.
2. Identify examples of policy, system, and environmental change efforts in school settings, consistent with SNAP-Ed guidance
3. Access and use technical assistance tools and resources in creating a healthier school environment.
Moderator: Cheryl Jackson Lewis, MPA, RD, LDN, USDA Food and Nutrition Service
Speaker: Erika Pijai, MS, RD, USDA Food and Nutrition Service; Andy Riesenberg, USDA Food and Nutrition Service, Western Regional Office; Heather Reed, MA, RDN, California Department of Education; Shannan D. Young, RDN, SNS, Dairy Council of California; Kate McDevitt, UC San Diego School Of Medicine, Center for Community Health
Primary focus of session: Nutrition Education, Practice

 


 

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